The Magazine as Medium 3: Dan Fox and Ruth Graham

Thursday 18 June, 2015
7 - 9pm, $0

Cabinet
300 Nevins Street, Brooklyn

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Why do people write letters to the editor? As one of the only democratic platforms embedded in the magazine, the “letters to the editor” section anticipated the interactive media forums of today by enabling readers to participate in the public sphere—whether through rants, corrections, or expressions of admiration. Historically, this section has also been a place where editors intervened pseudonymously in their own publications, a practice that Dan Fox will discuss in a contemporary context in relation to satire and art magazines, while Ruth Graham will examine high- and lowbrow letters as particular genres and the differences between reading such letters online and in print. 

Dan Fox is co-editor of frieze magazine. His writing has appeared in numerous exhibition catalogues, and his book Pretentiousness: Why It Matters will be published by Fitzcarraldo Editions later this year. He co-runs the music label Junior Aspirin Records, which has recently released two LPs by his bands Big Legs and the God in Hackney. As a teenager, he once had a letter published in the Times objecting to the London newspaper’s coverage of contemporary art.

Ruth Graham is a contributing writer at Slate and the Boston Globe. As a freelance journalist, she has reported for Al Jazeera America, the Wall Street Journal, and many other publications. She once had a letter to the editor published in New York magazine.

Carey Snyder is associate professor of English at Ohio University. Her essays on modernist magazines have appeared in the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies and the Modernist Journals Project website. She is the author of British Fiction and Cross-Cultural Encounters: Ethnographic Modernism from Wells to Woolf (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), and the editor of the Broadview Press cultural studies edition of H. G. Wells’s Ann Veronica (forthcoming 2015). 

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